Thursday, 4 April 2013

Hitler and Christianity

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Anyone who still argues that Hitler was a Christian might read these three quotations from Hitler, quoted in a good article by Craig Brown

‘The heaviest blow that ever struck humanity was the coming of Christianity.’ (11-12 July, 1941)


‘The best thing is to let Christianity die a natural death.’ (14 October, 1941)


‘The war will be over one day. I shall then consider that my life’s final task will be to solve the religious problem . . . The organised lie must be smashed.’ (13 December, 1941).


Brown might have added many more of course. One worth bearing in mind is this, recorded in the bunker by Martin Bormann:

“Had Charles Martel not been victorious at Poitiers — already, you see, the world had fallen into the hands of the Jews, so gutless a thing is Christianity! — then we should in all probability have been converted to Mohammedanism, that cult which glorifies heroism and which opens up the Seventh Heaven to the bold warrior alone. Then the Germanic races would have conquered the world. Christianity alone prevented them from doing so.”

 And there are other remarks like these:
"When one thinks of the opinions held concerning Christianity by our best minds a hundred, two hundred years ago, one is ashamed to realise how little we have since evolved. I didn't know that Julian the Apostate had passed judgment with such clear-sightedness on Chritianity and Christians.... the Galilean, who later was called the Christ, intended something quite different. He must be regarded as a popular leader who took up His position against Jewry... and it's certain that Jesus was not a Jew. The Jews, by the way, regarded Him as the son of a whore—of a whore and a Roman soldier. The decisive falsification of Jesus's doctrine was the work of St. Paul.... Paul of Tarsus (his name was Saul, before the road to Damascus) was one of those who persecuted Jesus most savagely."


 'Christianity is the prototype of Bolshevism: the mobilization by the Jew of the masses of slaves with the object of undermining society.'

Not every historian thinks the Table Talk trustworthy, it should be said, and Hitler always spoke to an audience and for a purpose. It is hard for anyone to know another's religious views and hard for one oneself to know unless one subscribes to a complete doctrine, such as Catholicism or Orthodox Christianity, which leave no room for private judgment, and even then there is often a very wide variety of belief. However, the many instances where Hitler talked of God and Christianity, especially before he took power, may reasonably have been designed to win support, while his denunciations of Christianity and theism were not meant for the public.

A greater mystery surrounds Churchill's opinion of what he called 'the Man Upstairs'. The great Maurice Cowling has written about this. I think the consensus is that Churchill remained an Edwardian progressive and never believed. 

I suppose Churchill and Hitler were both Edwardian progressives in their very different ways. Stalin and Lenin too. If only the conservatives had not led Germany and Austria into a tragic and wicked war in 1914 ...

5 comments:

  1. Yeh. So Jewish leaders should stop blaming Christianity for the Holocaust and as Rabbi Abraham Heschel has said that he and all Jews need to attack the souls of Christians by subtly accusing them of Natziism. He and his followers should begin by apologizing to the Catholic Church.

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  2. Hitler was definitely not a Christian. Naism was taught as superior to Christianity and as demanding total obedience and commitment. The Nazis firted with the occult and Himmler was an occulist through and through.

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  3. Yes but everybody (just kidding) was an occultist then. It was The Thing.

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  4. Every bloodthirsty dictator detests the local prevailing church. It's a competitor to in stilling their own ideology on the national flock and is naturally treated as a wicked mistress by the roosting wife.

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