Sunday, 24 September 2017

AfD are not extremists but the real Christian Democrats

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The German exit polls show the expected victory for the Christian Democrats and a stronger showing for the AfD, whom the BBC mistakenly calls far right, following the lead of the party's opponents.

They misuse the expression often. They use it for the Austrian Freedom Party and have done since the 1980s, even though the only thing right-wing about Freedom Party is opposing immigration. Which, along with scepticism towards the EU, is most of AfD's platform, though AfD has, inevitably, attracted some extremists and, regrettably, added

populist stuff about not allowing more mosques to be built and started saying very tactless things like 
"We have the right to be proud of the accomplishments of German soldiers in two world wars".
Not wanting more mosques, though it might be deplorable, is not enough to make them far right. The BBC and the media should study Sir Oswald Mosley and the American Nazi Party to see what the extreme right is like.

Paul Gottfried, who's Jewish, said in the spring that just about everything AfD advocates would fit into a Republican national platform. I suppose not the stuff about mosques.






The genuinely liberal (free markets, mildly sceptical of the EU) FDP are in Parliament and are good news - the Greens are not good news at all but very worrying.

Merkel was brought up as a Lutheran Marxist Leninist, a privileged member of the nomenklatura. You see this in her internationalism. Like the East Germans who took over in early 1990, she is strongly Green herself. She is not a conservative, but conservatism scarcely exists outside Bavaria and East Germany, as an unintended by blow of de-Nazification. In fact AfD, which like Merkel has East German Lutheran roots, could be said to be the real Christian Democrats. They oppose single sex marriage, for example.


The extremists are not AfD, who resemble UKIP (Nigel Farage backed them), but the Greens and the ex-Communist Left party (also East German, of course).

The Christian Democrats and the Social Democrats (SPD), whose policies are interchangeable after Frau Merkel cleverly stole the SPD policies on migrants, nuclear energy and many other things, are not extreme but their migrants policy, I would argue, is.


An obscure German Green Party politician called Dr. Stefanie von Berg is extreme but she spoke for many Greens and many other Germans when she told the Hamburg parliament, 

"Our society will change. Our society will change radically. In 20-30 years there will no longer be a German majority. We will live in a supercultural society. This is what we will have in the future. And I want to make it very clear, especially to right-wingers: This is a good thing!"
German politicians say they are very shocked that an AfD politician has said 'We shall hunt [or 'go after'] Merkel' - it sounds like they are going to have real British-style parliamentary politics for the first time. The kind of thing that horrifies the European Parliament when Nigel Farage speaks. Beatrix van Storch, one of the party's leaders, told the BBC, 
"We'll start debates on migration, we'll start debates on Islam, we'll start debates on ever closer union."
A German analyst told the BBC that she thinks the AfD voters are mostly male in a 'more female, gayer, more diverse' Germany, implying that they are a lost cause.  

Another German woman has just told the BBC that AfD are nostalgic for the old Germany "that has gone - get used to it". But no-one asked the Germans if they wanted it to go - and immigration is not finished, but only just beginning. She suggests AfD talk instead about how to create more jobs.

The BBC is taking it very badly.

22 comments:

  1. They are extremists and not Christian at all. Neither democrats. I feel ashamed for 13 percent of my country. Johanna

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    1. They oppose homosexual marriage unlike CDU.

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    2. Hatred and intolerance is not Christian at all.

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    3. Certainly not hatred but do they hate anyone? Tolerance of evil is itself an evil. Germany is threatened by great and foreseeable evils.

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    4. Gay people. People who fled war or suppression. And basically everyone more succesful or happy than they are.

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    5. They don't hate anyone. Migrants should be helped near country they come from or Germany will cease to be German. Germany is the country of the Germans and does not owe a duty to take millions of people, without papers, from a distant part of the world.

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    6. I don't believe in a country belonging to people lucky enough to be born there. I believe in living together peacefully under one common constitution.

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    7. 'Lucky' is a strange choice of word and suggests that the people born there owe a duty to people not lucky enough to be born there to let them settle there. This is dangerous nonsense.

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    8. I am lucky to be born in a country in peace and wealth. Being thankful doesn't mean to owe someone. Wtf are u so afraid of?

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    9. Fair enough - we are very very lucky to be European but we owe a duty to next generations to preserve Europe.

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    10. Who cries for that when it comes to environmental issues?! Just be happy not living in Germany,let me be happy I do.

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  2. Suggestions of shooting refugees before they had any power at all puts them firmly in the extreme category for most of us Germans, the moderate 87%.You should stick to travel writing and keep clear of theology you have no flair or feel for it.
    Kurt

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    1. Officers must "use firearms if necessary" to “prevent illegal border crossings" Ms Petry said - if alternative was people entering country by force.

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  3. Come to Germany and you will change your mind.

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  4. But the British, thankfully, don't need Nazis since most mainstream parties have adopted their policies...
    Eva

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  5. Cllr.Brian Silvester (@CllrBSilvester):
    #Marr
    Why does BBC call @AfD 'far right'?
    It's not far right to want controlled immigration
    It's common sense if we want to remain safe.

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  6. Nigel Farage is a tired alcoholic chain-smoker and loser who dropped the ball on Brexit the minute he got it. Apparently he is trying to move to Germany, playing the card of the estranged German wife.

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    1. Wasn't Churchill an "alcoholic chain-smoker"? And Hitler an animal loving vegetarian teetotaller? Aren't these ad hominem attacks?

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    2. Whatever else he is, he's no loser. He won a triumph at the referendum.

      Ad hominem attacks are pointless and therefore makes the person using them look stupid. But Anonymous is clearly angry about something.

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    3. You have perkily called Nigel Farage handsome and charming. Some of us see him as a loser -- Trump's term -- based on his inept and opportunistic handling of Brexit. He won the referendum over a year ago and did a runner. You are clearly sucking up to boozy, sleazy Nigel about something.

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  7. Calling AfD "extremist" is just your standard media reality-inversion. Its psychological warfare. In reality, the extremists are the German and other European establishments who are replacing their population with aliens. These aliens are mainly useless, stupid and violent with a primitive culture. The establishment extremists are saying with a straight face that our countries will continue function the same with a totally different population. They are unable to explain how that is going to work. Apparently, they believe the ground we live on is somehow magic. An "extremist" is someone who doesn't believe in magic dirt.

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  8. 60% percent protest voters. Many worry about security, which is a fair enough point. I think Boris Palmer, the mayor of Tübingen made the point very well: we can't help everyone. It's naive to think we can check the background of millions of refugees, just to tell them later, ah, well, you're not exactly a refugee. Of course, we can continue this invite-and-refuse game as long as there is money, but wouldn't it make sense to invest the money a bit more intelligently? Perhaps in development projects?
    Christoph (wondering whether there will ever be a reasonable migration-battling strategy)

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