Friday, 20 April 2018

Antisemitic riots in England in 1947 and antisemitism in England today

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Anti-Jewish feeling in England is said to have become a thing, thanks to the Labour Party and the progressive young. This article on the 1947 anti-Jewish riots is therefore now topical.

In 1947 the non-white population of Great Britain was estimated to be about twenty thousand. The Southern Irish had not yet completely ceased to be British and the largest ethnic minorities were Poles (160,000) and Jews (up to 400,000). 

Some allegations of anti-semitism (a lot in fact) boil down to the unpleasant tactic of calling people who oppose Israel's policy towards Arabs as anti-semites. But there is more to it than that as this article written by a young Labour supporter proves. As he says,

Corbyn is often described as a nice guy, and I’m sure he is in person. But it’s no coincidence that the anti-Semitism epidemic within Labour really kicked off when he became leader. He appealed to the young, and it’s the young these days who refuse to see Jews as an authentic minority. For them, Zionism is now a synonym for white supremacy, neoliberalism and western colonialism. As the years pass, the historical association changed. So now, for my generation, Jews are not oppressed. They are the oppressors.
Jews, having been hated for centuries for being Asiatics in Europe, are now, you see, hated for being Europeans in Asia.

What is also depressing is the widespread hatred of colonialism among the young, something which not only morphs into hatred of Jews but hatred of Europeans.

I have come across at least four British anti-semites over the last few years: two on the right and two on the left. Back in the 1980s in London it was an attitude I came across among some upper class people and people who aspired to mix with the upper classes.

I used to have a British Bengali Muslim friend, now dead, whom I suspected of being anti-Jewish (he was anti-Israel) and whom I probed on a whim. I asked him if, had he been in Germany in the 30s, would he have joined the Nazi Party?

His reply was:
Well, I don't really like joining movements.
I presume that he sympathised with the Nazis and it was the Jews that were his reason. 

He voted Labour and read the Guardian. He was kept for most of his life by the British state but, after his death, a common (British Indian Hindu) friend told me he was 'extremely racist'. I assume he was an anti-British racist, as well as anti-Semite, even though he always fell in love with white girls.

[Even I have finally given up on not using the word anti-semitism incorrectly. People who like Arabs are not anti-semites, of course. They may be anti-Jewish.]

2 comments:

  1. Anti-semitism isn’t a thing though really. The conflict in the labour party is between Muslim Corbynite Labour and Blairite New (Jew) Labour. Both agree that white Britain has got to go. The Labour party is more anti-white than it is anti-jewish. However, because White Brits have no peoplehood in modern Britain, nobody speaks for them so in the inverted media reality it doesn’t exist.

    The media war on Corbyn exists because Jew Labour want to have their cake an eat it. They want hardcore anti-white multiculturalism in Britain coupled with support for Israeli genocide of Palestinians and a Zionist foreign policy abroad.

    Feminist talk of “mansplaining”. Well think of the media’s obsession with anti-semitism as jews jewsplaining.

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  2. Not true really. Plenty of Jews were and no doubt are on the hard left including Ted Grant, the sinister leader of Militant Tendency. Jews like the Milibands are pro Arab.

    There are many more examples.

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