Friday, 22 June 2018

The fall of the Ottoman Empire explains most of our ills

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Someone else agrees with me that the decline and fall of the Ottoman Empire, which the Romanian historian and interwar Prime Minister Nicolae Iorga called 'Byzantium after Byzantium', is the cause of so many of the world's problems.

Paul T Horgan writes, in the consistently excellent online magazine Conservative Woman, that
The decline and fall of the Ottoman Empire is a global event that has occupied all of the Great Powers except China for about 300 years. 

Imagine if a democratic, federal Ottoman Empire ruled the Middle East and Greece. Imagine no Syria, no Saudi Arabia, no Libya and no Israel.



The dissolution of the Russian and Austrian Empires are also part of the problems we live with.


The dissolution of the French and British empires have caused many bad things, but were inevitable.


Is the best Eastern Europe can hope for now Intermarium? Is the Visegrad Group going to be a sort of Intermarium? Will Romania stop being a docile subject of the EU and join her old enemy Hungary in providing a critique of EU values?


I suspect the answer to my third question is: probably not.


Romania traditionally 'kisses the hand that strikes' her.


But we shall see.

10 comments:

  1. It is probably the best time to be a Romanian that there has ever been. Romanian seem to like their alliance with the west these days and want to keep it.

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  2. As I wrote in a previous similar posting of yours, there are only three viable states in an untampered-with Middle East-one based on the Nile Valley, one based on the Turkish language and one based on the Persian language. The rest are artificial religious or post colonial ephemera doomed to fail sooner or later. It is their failures which have created all the problems as well as the original dismantling by outsiders of the Ottoman Empire which, but for that interference at its weakest point, might well be with us today. Who is to say that Ataturk would not have been able to carry out his secular reforms of the Ottoman as opposed to the Turkish State? It did not happen so we now await the stabilisation of the region through its re-division between the old three. A painful process still slowed by outsiders and thus unlikely to be completed in my life time.
    Stephen Austen

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  3. Personally, I think the Ottoman Empire tops even the Soviet Union for the most evil empire the world has ever known. Even so... it might be worth looking into who wanted it broken apart and why.

    Some Muslims say the Ottoman Empire is coming back... and this time they will call it Eurabia.

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    1. Some Muslims say the Ottoman Empire is coming back... and this time they will call it Eurabia.

      It might not be a bad thing. It might be the only way to stop the Poz.

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    2. Poz?

      It's an alt-right term referring to the whole grab-bag of sexual and cultural degeneracy being pushed by progressives. The Poz is basically a very nasty social and cultural infectious disease.

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  4. Imagine if a democratic, federal Ottoman Empire ruled the Middle East and Greece. Imagine no Syria, no Saudi Arabia, no Libya and no Israel.

    Sounds great, except for the democratic part. Democracy kills everything. But on the whole, compared to what we have now and to what is coming soon, the Ottoman Empire now looks pretty good.

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  5. The Ottoman state was well on the way to reform by the time of the Great war and when I was in Palestine in early 80's, I met a number of very elderly fellows who had been around in those times and had nothing particularly bad to say about them.

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    1. The Ottoman state was well on the way to reform by the time of the Great war

      Reform is a nice word for the destruction of any institution. It sounds so much nicer to say you want to reform something rather than destroy it.

      If someone says that they want to implement democratic reforms what they mean is that they intend to destroy the society in question.

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  6. In my view, the real tragedy was the fall of the real Byzantium, many years prior. The pieces of that fall are still struggling and fighting for air: the muslim world, the christian orthodox world and catholic/protestant world. The catholic/protestant world thinks religion is insignificant and views the world in terms of the vague and misunderstood notion of 'democracy', but the orthodox/muslim world do not. Religion is helping Russians and Muslims reclaim their identity, or rather reject the non-identity vague global citizen status proposed by the West.
    I view the West at a significant disadvantage, as it doesn't grasp the issues of the time. And this, in spite of Western historians sounding the alarm bells 30 years ago. It's actually painful to watch the death of the West.
    Ana

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